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Shutter Terminology

Beaded:
A beaded detail that is molded into the inside edge of the face of each stile.

Board and Batten:
Traditionally used on barns but ideal for more rustic homes. Authentic tongue and groove look with the front and back of the shutter featuring the same bevelled look as if the shutter were made of individual boards.

Flat Panel Shutter:
A solid shutter where the center portion of the shutter is recessed from the stiles (i.e. Memphis style shutter).

Fixed Louvered Shutter:
Positioned the historically accurate way, the louvers are tilted in towards the wall when the shutter is in the open position.

Leaf:
A single shutter or 1/2 pair.

Mousehole:
A notched hole in the rails that accommodated the ends of the tilt rod when the louvers were in the closed position. Now it just adds to the authenitc appearence.

Mullions:
The vertical element between the stiles that acts as a divider. Found in Bahama shutters.

Radius or Arched Top:
A shutter which has a curved top.

Rails:
The horizontal crosspieces of a shutter (i.e. top rail, bottom rail, center rail).

Raised Panel Shutter:
A solid shutter where the center portion of the shutter panel protrudes outward from the surrounding routed bevel.

Shutter Capping:
A metal (most ususally copper) capping that was placed over the top edge of the shutter to prevent water intrusion and the resulting wood rot.

Stiles:
The upright vertical sections of a shutter which may be beaded or non-beaded.

Tilt Rod:
Working louver shutters had a rod, or tilt-rod, to move the louvers into the open or closed position. These are now purely decorative for those who truly desire the more authentic look.

 

 

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